Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

           

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

scan40+copy-2.png

Creative Writing


Creative Writing


A lot of my recent work is poetry inspired by different cultures, however most of the following are about my father’s (Pedro J. Padro) misadventures in Puerto Rico. Enjoy reading about Pedrito’s life.

Python Recipe (a burmese tale)

Spring 2016

Once you’ve caught your python

After it snuck into your bed

Take a machete and cut off its

Nose so that it cannot smell you

Or use it’s teeth to snap

Then lock the python in your room

Preferably with your third wife

And now the recipe begins

Preheat your oven to 375

Prepare a seasoning of curry and lime

Check the room to see whom is dead

If the snake is still breathing

Find your oldest child Th Oo

Who is likely hiding in the woods

Wrangle the Python

Into the preheated oven

And cook for five minutes


a Boy Gave me a

Chicken-flavored Lollipop

Spring 2016

And I stared at the words POLLITO ALVBRO

in bright red type.

He blushed and mumbled something in Spanish.

No hablo Español — I said too loud —

as I examined my prize.

That consequently was also the shape

of a chicken with T-Rex claws.

I hid it from my parents

in a grey Sketchers shoebox;

carefully placed between a Michael Jordan

rookie card and a photo of my dead dog. 


A Ghost in Barceloneta

Spring 2016

Pedrito stared at the crunchy ceiling

as he listened to his sisters’ breaths

move rhythmically

in a symphony of snores and exhalation.

 

An overgrown bamboo plant stretched

toward the window and acted as

a percussive bravado to their slumber.

 

Illuminated by the platano-shaped moon,

Pedrito recounted who was sleeping where tonight:

Anna Delia and Gloria beside him,

Seraphin and Elisa above him in the hamaca,

and Carmen and the rest at his feet.

 

Quickly and methodically, he made his way,

pausing only to see if he disturbed the rhythm.

“Usted es un cheetah,” Seraphin teased

when Pedrito would appear in the fields.

“Que es esto un cheetah,” he would reply.

 

Smiling to himself, he ran into the forest,

found his old red bicycle beside a mango tree,

and sped down the mountain.

The world came to him in a

blur of every shade of green.

 

“Sale loco de contento con

Au cargamento para la ciudad

Ay, para la ciudad, lleva en su pensamiento

Todo un mundo lleno de felicidad, ay, de felicidad.”

 

He sets off happily with

his cargo to the city

to the city, carries in his thoughts

a whole world filled with happiness.

 

Pedrito reached an intersection in the road

as he sang his tune of Barceloneta.

“Just at the chorus,” he liked to say,

“mis ojos were as big as a jack fruit.”

 

The trees and the coquis grew silent

as an amorphous figure appeared from the dirt.

She asked for help with her Buick as it appears

to be smashed but can likely be repaired.

 

“I don’t see a car!” Pedrito yelled as he

threw his bike and sprinted past the grinning figure.

“I’ve never ran so fast in all my life,” he recalled.

He also made a point of questioning his logic.

 

A worker found Pedrito a few hours later

shaking underneath a truck.
“Boy what’s wrong
with you?”

 

Pedrito started his first day picking pineapples. 


The sky shifted to a warm hue

as Pedrito and his sisters ate yuca

that mama pounded with her hands

just a few hours ago.

 

Mama sat in the hamaca and released

her hair from its binding

As the island grew silent

and they sat beside her feet.

 

“There was once a woman and her son

in the mountains who were very poor

and they owned one thing;

un huevo de un pollo.

 

They took care of this egg

hoping that it would hatch

and grow to be

un pollo grande.

 

One day la mama rested the egg

beside the fire to stay warm.

But her son grew very hungry

and ate half of the egg.

 

A month passed while

the uneaten half 

rested near the fire; 

then the egg started to hatch.

 

It hatched and it was

a half-chicken and a half-pig.

It had one leg, one wing,

half a snout, and a tail.

 

So they raised the chicken

and the chicken grew up

and the boy got older

and the two played together.

 

One day the boy told his mother

‘Mama I’m leaving. Yo quiero ver

el mundo y encontrar trabajo.’

So he took off and the half-chicken followed.

...

The two kept going and going

until they ran into a bull and 

the bull said ‘where are you going?’

The boy said, ‘I’m going to see if I can get rich.’

 

The bull said, ‘will you take me with you?’

The boy said, ‘if you could make yourself

very small and get into the chicken’s butt

then you can go.’

 

So the bull started squeezing and squeezing

and made himself very small

and got into the 

chicken’s butt.

 

They kept going and going

until they ran into a horse and 

the horse said ‘where are you going?’

The boy said, ‘I’m going to see if I can get rich.’

 

The horse said, ‘will you take me with you?’

The boy said, ‘if you could make yourself

very small and get into the chicken’s butt

then you can go.’

 

So the horse started squeezing and squeezing

and made himself very small

and got into the 

chicken’s butt.

 

They kept going and going

until they ran into a river and 

the river said ‘where are you going?’

The boy said, ‘I’m going to see if I can get rich.’

 

The river said, ‘will you take me with you?’

The boy said, ‘if you could make yourself

very small and get into the chicken’s butt

then you can go.’

 

The river said, ‘will you take me with you?’

The boy said, ‘if you could make yourself

very small and get into the chicken’s butt

then you can go.’

 

Soon they passed the other side of the mountain

and the boy knocked on a farmer’s door.

The boy said, ‘can we stay here?’

The farmer said, ‘no, you can’t stay here.’

 

The boy was very hungry and he saw 

a pie in the window

then he went ahead

and grabbed it.

 

The farmer saw him eating the pie

and got very mad

so he grabbed the boy and half-chicken.

‘Ou! Les gusta tomar las cosas que no le pertenece!’

 

The farmer said, ‘I’m going to teach you 

a lesson. I’m putting you in the growl with the horses

and they will step 

all over ustedes y van a matar a todos.’

 

The farmer tied up the boy and half-chicken,

then night came and the horses started kicking;

the bull, the horse, and the river

came out of the chicken’s butt.

 

The farmer checked in the morning

and they found the horses dead

and the boy and half-chicken sleeping.

‘This half-chicken and this boy — they are the devil!

 

What is it you want?’

‘Well, we want all we can carry,’ the boy said.

So the horse and the bull got out of 

the half-chicken’s butt.

 

And they took all that they could carry

to la casa de la mama’.”

Half-Chicken and Half-Pig

(A Puerto Rican Tale)

Spring 2016